Cindy Jenson-Elliott

Children's Book Author, Environmental Educator               


Visit My Blog!
http://naturexplorer.wordpress.com
Contact me:
cjensonelliott@gmail.com

NEW! Weeds Find a Way Curriculum Guide
Click the picture above to
download free
curriculum guide


 



 
Click here to Order Weeds Find a Way
See our Book Trailer!


Weeds Find a Way Blog Tour
Join me on parenting, nature and science blogs to chat about her picture book debut, WEEDS FIND A WAY, illustrated by Carolyn Fisher.

My first stop began at the popular Growing with Science blog on Monday, February 24 and will continue on through Friday, March 7. Stop in for reviews, interviews and chats with Cindy, book giveaways and more!

Monday, February 24 visit Growing With Science 
Tuesday, February 25 visit As They Grown Up
Wednesday, February 26 visit Kid Lit Frenzy
Thursday, February 27  visit Sharpread
Friday, February 28 visit Children's Book Review

Monday, March 3 visit Let's Go Chipper
Tuesday, March 4 visit Just a Little Creativity
Wednesday, March 5 visit Unleashing Readers
Thursday, March 6 visit 5 Minutes for Books
Friday, March 7 visit Archimedes Notebook

Get ready for spring and weeds! Meet Author Cindy Jenson-Elliott in person on Friday, March 7th from 4:00 - 7:00 pm at The Yellow Book Road Bookstore in San Diego for a book reading and planting for the entire family.

Click on the photo from our book launch to see what Publishers Weekly had to say about the event!


Check out the latest discussion of Weeds Find a Way on Kirkus:
 https://www.kirkusreviews.com/features/ficinformational-books/.
The  first review of Weeds Find a Way is in!
This is from Kirkus:
 
Adaptable weeds find ways to spread themselves and their seeds, to grow in strange places, and to be loved and admired.

Mixed-media digital collage illustrations on double-page spreads follow a girl and her dog through a world of weeds, from seeds to flowers. Sometimes—as in an image of milkweed seeds shooting from a pod—these pictures focus on the weeds themselves; sometimes they include parts of the girl or dog; and some are full scenes. Weed seeds wait through a winter snow. They bake on hot sidewalks. They sprout “in a tangle of tree roots” and flower into “umbrellas of the finest white lace.” Some shatter and spread when pulled; others avoid being eaten, thanks to thorns and poisons. The hand-lettered alliterative text provides a simple introduction to the idea of weeds. With very few lines to each page, it reads aloud smoothly. The author, a California-based nature educator, includes a “Meet the Weeds” afterword, defining them as plants growing where they aren’t wanted and describing 24 common U.S. weeds, from dandelions to wild oats. A small, suggestive image accompanies each description.

Neither formal introduction nor field guide, this unusual reminder of weeds’ admirable qualities nevertheless merits a place on the nature-study shelf of preschool and early-elementary classrooms. (Informational picture book, ages 3 - 7)


Here's the latest review from School Library Journal

JENSON-ELLIOTT, Cindy. Weeds Find a Way. illus. by Carolyn Fisher. 40p. S & S/Beach Lane. Feb. 2014. Tr $16.99. ISBN 9781442412606; ebk. $12.99. ISBN 9781442441262. LC 2011018524.

K-Gr 2–Instead of lamenting their pesky invasiveness, Jenson-Elliott celebrates weeds for their heartiness and ability to disseminate and adapt. Poetic imagery describes how they are “shot out of tight, dry pods like confetti from a popped balloon” and “baking in shimmering summer heat on a white-hot sidewalk without a whisper of wind”), and the bold colors of the mixed media/digital collage illustrations do an admirable job of making the ordinary become stunning. More detailed information about how weeds can actually be useful despite their reputation can be found in the back matter, along with a list both identifying and offering further facts about the plants pictured in the book. Looking for where the nodding thistle, oxeye daisy, spotted knapweed, etc., appear in the story will encourage repeated readings and offer more opportunities for learning. Expect to have readers rooting and exploring for the ubiquitous plants.–Joanna K. Fabicon, Los Angeles Public Library

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